Global civilizations, identities, and violence with Globus et Locus

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Peter W. Schulze, co-founder of the DOC Research Institute, participated in the prestigious international roundtable on ‘Global civilizations, identities, and violence’ on 15 July 2019. Organised by the Italian foundation Globus et Locus, the roundtable took place at Palazzo Ferro Fini in Venice.

Political and diplomatic representatives, as well as authoritative international scholars such as Fabio Finotti (University of Trieste), Hans Köchler (University of Innsbruck), Scott Lash (University of Oxford), Mehdi Mozaffari (Aarhus University), Maria Laura Picchio Forlati (Foundation Venezia per la Ricerca sulla Pace), and Peter W. Schulze (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen) presented their thoughts.

The event began with a general reflection that the principal effect of globalisation has been to reduce the relevance of the modern nation-state. In this ongoing process, the role of the state as a pillar of political order and social cohesion has become less prominent.

Negative effects on cultural identity have been connected to diminishing state authority. On the global stage, diverse civilisations have appeared with different cultural profiles, with varying expressions of adherence to principles of peaceful dialogue on one hand and violence and aggression on the other hand. Such processes are embedded in the transience of the present international order, which is ruled by uncertainties, violence, and conflicts.

Peter Schulze’s presentation, ‘Multipolarity and multilateralism: Cooperative or rival cornerstones of a new world order?’, sought to shed some light on the complicated issue of global governance and what to expect from a multipolar order.

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