Round-table #1. “From Deadlock to Solutions: Towards a Comprehensive Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian Peace and Security Order”

05 Oct 2018
14:30 – 16:00
Nefeli

Moderators

Mary Dejevsky
Peter W. Schulze
Peter W. Schulze

Speakers

Adrian Pabst
Adrian Pabst
Sergey-Markedonov
Sergey Markedonov
Winfried_Veit
Winfried Veit
Richard Sakwa
Richard Sakwa
Alexey Gromyko
Alexey Gromyko

Round-table #1. “From Deadlock to Solutions: Towards a Comprehensive Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian Peace and Security Order”

We are living through turbulent times. As the former German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier fittingly described the international situation, “the world is in disarray”. Such disorder is the symptom of a world in rapid transition. While the future elements of the outcome of this transformation are difficult to predict, one thing remains clear: Although the Cold War ended, several core elements of the bipolar order remained components of the succeeding unipolar period and have shaped the present tendencies towards a multipolar order. Opportunities to create a lasting peace and security order, at least for the European continent, were present at the end of the 1980s and found expression in the 1990 Charter of Paris. Today however, the European space has become one of rivalry, where Russia and the West are moving apart and disagreeing on fundamental issues. A shift in thinking and fundamental structural changes are needed in order to reverse this course. The notion of a comprehensive European security and peace order must be rejuvenated. The Ukraine crisis, which is the most threatening danger for Europe, must be resolved. Without a solution in Ukraine, the reestablishment of consensus, cooperation, and trust in Russia-West relations seems impossible. The aim of the panel is to outline the potential parameters of an inclusive and cooperative pan-European security architecture and to explore mechanisms through which a further deterioration of relations between Russia and the West can be avoided and cooperation be enhanced.

  • What are the main obstacles to building a new, more inclusive Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian security system?
  • How can the OSCE contribute to building an inclusive security community from Vancouver to Vladivostok?
  • What are the prospects for a peaceful resolution of the Ukraine crisis?
  • Which mechanisms might help to avoid a deterioration of relations and possible escalation between Russia and the West on political and military levels?

 

Moderators:

MARY DEJEVSKY, Broadcaster and writer, The Independent, The Guardian
PETER W. SCHULZE, Professor, Political Science Department, Georg-August University of Gőttingen